Atlantisch Perspectief 2020 nr. 4

Special Edition: Uncovering an unseen nemesis

In dit nummer:

 

  • NATO in the fourth domain: How well is it doing?
  • Conquering the invisible battleground
  • How to counter worsening cyber-security threats
    The international strategy of the Dutch government
  • Damaging the opponent ‘the new way’
    Understanding the tactics behind hack-and-leak operations                 
  • “It is useful to look at cyber as if it were a sport"
    Paul Ducheine on the legal dimensions of cyber-security
  • The cyber-security waterbed effect: insider risks on the increase         
  • Which is more important: online privacy or national security?                 
    The Dutch position in the ongoing encryption       
  • Whose cyber is it anyways?
    A private perspective on a public good
  • An Arms Race in Outer Space?
  • Time to Give Up on the Americans?
    Reflections on a New Recommendation to the Dutch Government        

Deze editie kunt u vanaf 14 september 2020 in de brievenbus verwachten.

 

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NATO in the fourth domain: How well is it doing?
 

If conflict was always about weakening your adversary and gaining political control or leverage over him, then the advent of the Information Age has created a situation where what is truly important to our societies is harder to defend and easier to attack. Jamie Shea provides an overview on how well NATO is doing in cyberspace. >> Read article
 

Conquering the invisible battleground

          

From a military and security perspective cyberspace is not merely a virtual dimension that needs to be reckoned with. Peter B.M.J. Pijpers and Kreasten L. Arnold describe the potency of cyberspace as a new domain of engagement, including for military actors such as NATO.

 

How to counter worsening cyber-security threats                     

The international strategy of the Dutch government

 

Waves of democratization, like the Arab Spring, were spurred or amplified by social media. However, with those opportunities and increased interconnectedness came threats and vulnerabilities. Timo S. Koster explains how online interdependence has increasingly exposed us to malicious actors with bad intentions. >> Read article

 

Damaging the opponent ‘the new way’                                            

Understanding the tactics behind hack-and-leak operations

 

Malicious actors use cyber tools to gain access to sensitive or secret material and then release it in the public domain. James Shires argues that NATO partners should develop a coherent strategy and thorough understanding of the dynamics of hacking and leaking, based on academic research on both cyber conflict and digital media. >> Read article

 

“It is useful to look at cyber as if it were a sport”                                                                        Paul Ducheine on the legal dimensions of cyber-security
 

Society has become increasingly susceptible to the threats that come with cyberspace. How do governments cope with these dangers? In an interview with Gerben Stormbroek and Bart Brouwers of the Netherlands Atlantic Association, Paul Ducheine, professor of Cyber Warfare, provides insight in the legal dimensions of cyber-security.

 

The cyber-security waterbed effect: insider risks on the increase                                             

                                                                      

The geopolitical tensions in the world, especially between China, Russia and the United States, have emphasized the targeting of Western secrets. With organizations still investing heavily to prevent external cyber intrusions, skilled threat actors are seeing increased value in targeting insiders who can bypass controls. According to Elsine van Os and Erik Schneider the consequences will be severe.

                                  

Which is more important: online privacy or national security?                                                   

The Dutch position in the ongoing encryption

 

Encryption is a fundamental technology that underpins the Internet and cyber-security as a whole. Following a wave of terrorist attacks in 2015, the issue of installing backdoors in encryption again became subject to political debate in various Western countries. The Netherlands took a unique position, as analyzed by Jeroen Veen and Sergei Boeke.

 

Whose cyber is it anyways?

A private perspective on a public good

 

Unlike the other domains of land, sea, air and space, cyber is not a force of nature where the laws of physics and constitutional laws apply. Unlike the other domains, the cyber domain is not owned by governments. According to Anouk Vos a small number of large companies hold the key in the overall security of the cyber domain.      

 

An Arms Race in Outer Space?

 

The cyber domain has created new dynamics in competition between rivalling states. That means that vital infrastructure, not only on earth but also in its orbit, is vulnerable to cyberattacks, attacks which might eventually lead to conventional conflict. The cyber domain and the space domain are strongly related to each other. According to Lonneke Peperkamp regulation of military activities in space is needed. >> Read article

Time to Give Up on the Americans?          

Reflections on a New Recommendation to the Dutch Government          

                                              

Much more than in the past, the Netherlands, according to a report by the official Advisory Council on International Questions (Adviesraad Internationale Vraagstukken, AIV), ought to put its energy and resources toward the development of European capabilities and institutions as NATO is just not what it used to be. According to Ruud van Dijk a public debate on the outcome of the report is needed. >> Read article

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